Monday, December 1, 2014

Thai King is Dead and WTC Nuclear Demolition!

Dear Recipients,

 

The King of Thailand has been dead since about the end of 2008. The current King of Thailand is a fake one. The Government of Thailand does not dare to announce his death because it will put Thailand in great trouble. The King of Thailand was keen on photography and he has been seen using his outdated Canon G9 camera even as late as 2012. In addition, his double forgot to remove his watch and appeared to be wearing two watches in the public. These were big mistakes. In addition, Mr. Dimitri Khalezov knew of the King's death from a close friend of the King's body guard. Visit thaikingisdead dot com or download the file at mediafire dot com/download/3ax5ag6sta58qi6/ThaiKingIsDead dot zip. Be quick, the links may not last long.

 

Mr. Dimitri Khalezov is an important researcher and witness to the 9/11 event. In fact, he was a nuclear intelligence officer in the former Soviet Union. He testifies that WTC 1, 2 and 7 were demolished by three underground thermonuclear devices during the 9/11 event. As a matter of fact, there were large cavities found at ground zero (point of nuclear explosion in all English dictionaries printed prior to 2002) and tens of thousands of first responders and local Manhattan residents have suffered from cancers as a result of exposure to this radiation. Google "Dimitri Khalezov" and visit 911thology dot com or 911-truth dot net. There are videos and pdf files available for your research. Don't miss them.

 

 

The Thai Police and Judges have been warned not to touch Dimitri in 2012. However, they did not listen to his warning. Dimitri has been framed by the Thai Police for allegedly using and making fake passports, however he is innocent. On May 1st, 2014, he was sentenced to 1 year in prison by the Thai Supreme Court. The Thai officials were warned seriously multiple times to release Dimitri and make compensation to him for their wrong doings. Otherwise, his friends will publish this damaging information - the King of Thailand died. Now, the deadline has passed and the high ranking Thai officials have yet to respond. As Dimitri is a man of word, his friends have no choice but to execute his will accordingly. In turn, the current Government of Thailand will be punished.

 

The world is cruel to Dimitri. He is the one who has the back bone to stand up and disclose the truth about the 9/11 event so clearly. It turns out that very few people understand and accept his explanation. The main stream media is ignoring the truth about 9/11 which is much more important than Snowden's case. Now, he is in prison. Nobody speaks for him. So, please help this upright person - Dimitri Khalezov. Tell your friends and relatives about the nuclear demolition of the WTC during the 9/11 event. This is an injustice that Dimitri has suffered in Thailand. The death of the Thai King must be known so that the Thai people can free themselves from the current corrupt and illegitimate military government.

 

In fact, this email has been sent to over one hundred million of recipients. Do not be afraid to forward it as much as possible.

 

Take action now! The truth will set you free!

 

Good friends of Dimitri

 

P.S.

To know more about Nuclear Demolition of the World Trade Center, visit

911thology dot com/nexus1 dot html

911thology dot ru/nexus1 dot html

911thology-thai dot com/nexus1 dot html

911thology-arabic dot com/nexus1 dot html

 

The download links for Dimitri's full book about the 9/11 event are listed below

mediafire dot com/download/i5qvsnpdvl3ivur/9-11thology-third_truth_v4_full dot zip

mediafire dot com/download/p8kdj6mhzcaccr6/9-11thology-third_truth_v4_full dot zip

share-online dot biz/dl/ZNB7H0SM5EJ

rapidshare dot com/files/3252256303/9-11thology-third_truth_v4_full dot zip

911-truth.net/9-11thology-third_truth_v4_full dot zip

 

For future communication, please use the following emails:

dkcontact1999[at]gmail.com or free.dimitri[at]gmail.com

Friday, November 21, 2014

OVERCOME ANXIETY & NERVOUSNESS

Nervousness overwhelm us and leave us feeling out of control, and it may indicate that you have an anxiety disorder and need help.

RELAX AND BREATHS
think positive
WRITE YOUR THOUGHTS DOWN
avoid stimulants such as nicotine and coffee
FACE YOUR PROBLEM HEAD-ON WHEN YOU ARE READY
meditate
LAUGH IT OFF
talk to someone


Source - 1Klassifieds / NST

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

MYpalmoil

MYpalmoil


Oleo exports to surpass RM11b

Posted: 10 Nov 2014 01:32 AM PST

KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia's oleochemical exports are expected to climb 20 per cent to surpass RM11.2 billion this year, thanks to the manufacturers' efforts in upgrading their fatty acids and fatty alcohol throughput.

Malaysian Oleochemical Manufacturers Group president Tan Kean Hua said, since 2010, major oleochemical manufacturers have upgraded their fatty acids and fatty alcohol throughput to leverage on economies of scale.

"To date, our members are churning out 2.8 million tonnes," he said at the sidelines of Oils & Fats International Congress 2014, here, recently. 

Following Turkey-based Evyap Sabun's RM500 million  investment in a 400,000 tonne-a-year oleochemical plant in Johor, Malaysia now has 19 oleochemical companies. They produce basic oleochemicals such as fatty acids, fatty alcohols, esters and refined glycerine.


Specialty chemical manufacturers, higher up the value chain, process these basic oleochemicals further and formulate them into toothpaste, soap, dishwashing liquid, laundry detergent, industrial lubricants and even food emulsifiers.

Since January 2013, the restructuring of the crude palm oil (CPO) tax to match that of Indonesia has levelled the playing field with Indonesia and allowed Malaysia's palm oil exports to be more competitive.

"As long as the investing climate here is on equal footing with our neighbour, we're able to produce and ship out more from Malaysian shores," Tan said.

Malaysia has decided to lift the CPO tax for the four months between September and December, while the Indonesian government let the existing CPO tax structure run its course.

As palm oil prices is averaging below US$750 (RM2,512) a tonne, it is attracting zero duty in Indonesia.

"Since CPO price is currently trading below tax thresholds, the effect of lifting the CPO tax or letting it run its course is the same. Both Malaysia and Indonesia are not taxing CPO exports as long as they are trading below RM2,250 and US$750 a tonne, respectively," he said.

But what if the CPO price were to surpass the threshold levels of RM2,250 and US$750 per tonne? 

Tan pursed his lips and tactfully replied, "as palm oil downstream investors, we urge the government to be very careful and mindful about maintaining a level playing field with that of Indonesia."

"All we ask for is for an equal chance to compete. Malaysia's tax gap between crude and refined palm oil must mirror that of Indonesia's. This is vital for the survival of Malaysia's billions of ringgit of palm oil downstream investments," he said.

According to the Malaysian Palm Oil Board, the country exported RM8.53 billion worth of oleochemicals in the first nine months of the year. "I think this year, we should be able to do 20 per cent more than last year's RM9.30 billion," he added.

Monday, November 10, 2014

MYpalmoil

MYpalmoil


It's a sin to kill a mockingbird

Posted: 08 Nov 2014 06:53 PM PST

"It's a sin to kill a mockingbird." A well-respected veteran in the palm oil industry looked puzzled when I mentioned this quote, a few days ago. We were having lunch at a Japanese restaurant, his favourite, when I asked if he had read a book titled 'To Kill A Mockingbird' by American author Harper Lee.

"What is a mockingbird? How do you spell it?" he asked.

I explained to him that a mockingbird is a creature that sings beautifully for the benefit of others and never harm anyone.

Atticus said to Jem one day, "I'd rather you shot at tin cans in the backyard, but I know you'll go after birds. Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit them ... but remember, it's a sin to kill a mockingbird."

That was the only time I ever heard Atticus say it was a sin to do something. And I asked Miss Maudie about it. "Your father's right," she said. "Mockingbirds don't do one thing except make music for us to enjoy.

"They don't eat up people's gardens, don't nest in corn cribs, they don't do one thing but sing their hearts out for us.

"That's why it's a sin to kill a mockingbird."


These lines from Chapter 10 are the source of the novel's title; the idea of "mockingbirds" as innocent people who are frequently misunderstood, discriminated and bullied out of jealousy, prejudice, racism, bigotry, arrogant assumptions and ignorance. 

Anyone who tries to hurt "mockingbirds" is actually committing a sin because these kind-hearted souls have done no harm but make the world a better place for those around them.

This novel is set out in the 1930s at a small southern state of USA, when the main form of prejudice was racism. The author lays down the moral of her story with the main characters, Atticus Finch and his young daughter Scout and teenage son, Jem. 
In this novel Scout and Jem learnt from their father to be courageous in protecting the innocent, kind-hearted souls metaphored as "mockingbirds". There are two in this novel. 

The first is Tom Robinson, a black man who did nothing to deserve trouble except try to help a young girl who seemed desperately lonely and seemed in need of his help. In an ironic exchange for that innocent act of kindness, he was wrongly accused of rape. 

The entire premise of false allegations against Tom and Atticus's decision to defend him is about this theme of killing mockingbirds. It is a lawyer's job to defend his client no matter what; it is even more important when that client is unequivocally innocent but being prosecuted simply because he is black. 


It is a sin to turn a blind eye on bullying and hateful racism. It is a sin to kill a mockingbird. Atticus steadfastly defended Tom. He argued that if the jury succumbed to popular sentiment and pronounced Tom as guilty, the black man's death can be equated to "the senseless slaughter of songbirds by hunters and children." 
The other mockingbird is Boo Radley. As the years go by, Scout finally understood humanity when she asked her father that in making fun of reclusive Boo Radley, just because he is different from others, would be "sort of like shooting at a mockingbird." 

Like Tom, Boo had never done any harm but acted with a good heart to others, especially the Finch children. 

A recluse who rarely sets foot outside his house, Boo was a haunting mystery that tugs at the wild imagination of Jem, Scout, and Dill. An unlikely symbol of goodness shrouded in initial creepiness, Boo secretly left little gifts for them in a knot-hole of a tree trunk. A painfully shy man, Boo's innocence and kind-hearted acts were constantly overwhelmed by prejudiced half-truths inculcated by ignorant folks.

As Scout learnt how easy it is for many to misunderstand the reclusive Boo, she repays his kindness by protecting him from prejudice. 
In today's context, the mockingbird is the palm oil industry. The businessman seated across the lunch table asked ... so, when the uninformed public chant along with the critics in condemning palm oil can be likened to ignorant children killing the mockingbird?

I nodded and he blinked despairingly. An air of solemnity descend upon us. We drank our green tea in silence.

Friday, November 7, 2014

MYpalmoil

MYpalmoil


Meeting demand

Posted: 05 Nov 2014 06:01 PM PST

EDIBLE OIL SUPPLY: Malaysia and Indonesia must accelerate oil palm plantings to avoid acute shortage, warns analyst

KUALA LUMPUR: HAMBURG-BASED ISTA Mielke GmbH executive director Thomas Mielke has warned that developing nations will face acute shortage of cooking oil in the next few years if Indonesia and Malaysia continue to slow down their oil palm plantings.



"We must not be lulled into believing the green activists' skewed ideology. We must differentiate between perception and reality. 

"The truth is, there is a huge discrepancy between the supply and demand of certified sustainably produced palm oil. We have 10 million tonnes of this oil but the demand is only a fraction of that."

Mielke, a well-respected and authoritative vegetable oil analyst, appealed to the public to wake up and smell the coffee.

In addressing an audience of some 500 at the Oils and Fats International Congress 2014, here, yesterday, he said in the last 10 years, the global oil palm planted area had only added 7.5 million hectares.

"This is so small compared to soyabean's increment of 27.2 million hectares, rapeseed's 8.8 million hectares and sunflower's 4.3 million hectares."

In the last 25 years, global palm oil consumption had expanded threefold. Rapeseed oil purchases, however, only increased by 2.5 times and soyabean oil's popularity just doubled. 

As global palm oil usage increased in the last two decades, so did trade rivalry. Hence, the smear campaign against the oil palm industry.

Oil palm plantation companies face relentless false allegations spread by well-funded green activists. Damning accusations of air pollution, forced labour and land grab in Indonesia, Papua New Guinea and Liberia are wrongly hurled at these corporates.

"Consumers must reject green activists' protests against the expansion of oil palm plantings. We must not be misled by perception. The current bearish sentiment is not fundamentally justified. The market is in transition," Mielke said.

Yesterday, the third-month benchmark for crude palm oil contract on Bursa Malaysia Derivatives Exchange fell RM56 to close at RM2,252 per tonne. 

"China oilseed output has declined to a 15-year low. Agricultural land is scarce and India's population continues to multiply. In order to satisfy the daily oils and fats need of an increasing global population, Indonesia and Malaysia must accelerate the planting of more higher yielding oil palms," he said.

In 2010, the world population was 6.92 billion. By 2020, the figure is estimated to expand to 7.72 billion. As the developing world progresses, the rising middle class' changing diet for tastier snacks and confectionery will fuel demand for more edible oils. This can only be realistically met by palm oil.

"Every year, the world's hunger for edible oils grow by an additional five million tonnes. Since oil palm is, by far, the most productive oil crop, we must pick up the pace of planting oil palms. If not, the world will face edible oil shortage by 2020," he added.

Palm oil exports to exceed RM61b

Posted: 05 Nov 2014 05:52 PM PST

PETALING JAYA:  Malaysia's palm oil exports for the year is expected to be better than last year's RM61.36 billion as the commodity's prices have improved and exporters are shipping out more volumes of oil.

For the first nine months, Malaysia has shipped out RM47.62 billion worth of palm oil products.

Palm oil futures prices have been averaging at around RM2,430 a tonne, slightly higher than last year's RM2,380 a tonne.

"This year, we should do slightly better because palm oil prices are averaging at a higher level and we're producing more oil. 

"I'm maintaining this year's crude palm oil output at 19.5 million tonnes, which is slightly higher than last year's 19.22 million tonnes," said Malaysian Palm Oil Board economist Ramli Abdullah.

Yesterday, the third-month benchmark for crude palm oil contract on Bursa Malaysia Derivatives Exchange fell RM56 to close at RM2,252 a tonne. 

He said palm oil prices are likely to trade range-bound and unlikely to dip below RM2,000 a tonne for the rest of the year as many oil-consuming countries have started to restock on this kitchen staple.

Ramli was speaking at a seminar organised by the Palm Oil Refiners Association of Malaysia, here, last week. Also present was INTL FCStone senior risk manager Ryan Long.

He urged the mid-sized plantation companies, who cannot afford their own team of traders, to subscribe to INTL FCStone's offer of fundamental and technical market intelligence, forecasting, historical databases, news and econometric analysis of edible oils. 

"We can help those mid-sized oil palm companies to manage their business risks. We can help hedge their position for a fee. These businesses are exposed to the volatility of palm oil prices. Risk cannot be eliminated, but we are here to help manage it," he said.

Wednesday, November 5, 2014

MYpalmoil

MYpalmoil


Coffee and creamer are best friends!

Posted: 03 Nov 2014 08:06 PM PST

Some people like their coffee black but I love mine milky.

Whether it is Arabica (highland) or Liberica (lowland) coffee beans, I like it drowned in creamer or milk.

:) Just so you know .. there's specialty palm fats in coffee creamer.

A couple of months back, my friend from Singapore met up with me at an oil palm estate in Johor to learn how tree breeders come up with designer seeds.

After the visit, we were treated to a delightful stint of premium coffee. It tasted so good she bought a few packets of Paloh Liberica Coffee. She also gave me a packet. Yay!

More recently, we met up again at an edible oils and fats traders' event. This time, it is at the ballroom of a hotel in Petaling Jaya, Selangor. We were seated at the same table. It's nice to catch up with friends.

As we parted ways to go to the washroom, a banker approached me and commented my friend is very beautiful and attractive. 

I found it strange that he didn't approach her directly and compliment her in person.

When he asked for the telephone number of my hot-looking friend, I blinked, "well, she usually spends time with younger men who can really move and shake the market."

He was stunned. Tick, tock, tick, tock, tick, tock ... 

I guess it didn't help when I stared back at him dead-panned. After what seemed like an eternity of awkward silence, I quipped, "it's coffee time." 


Tuesday, November 4, 2014

MYpalmoil

MYpalmoil


January 2015 start for MSPO

Posted: 02 Nov 2014 06:49 PM PST

PETALING JAYA, Selangor (Bernama): THE Malaysian Sustainable Palm Oil (MSPO) sustainable palm oil certification scheme will be implemented in January, said the Plantation Industries and Commodities Ministry.

Its minister Datuk Amar Douglas Uggah Embas said the MSPO standard and certification would also be the basis for the global branding of Malaysian palm oil.


"The principles and criteria under the MSPO is finalised and field trials have also been completed," he said at the Palm Oil Refiners Association of Malaysia (Poram) annual dinner, here, over the weekend.

He said Malaysia's refining industry had been at the forefront of the export market and is working hand-in-hand with the plantation, milling, oleochemical and biodiesel sectors to generate more value added income for the country.

"Currently, there are 58 palm oil refineries in operation with a total annual refining capacity of 26.1 million tonnes," Uggah added.

Of the 17.6 million tonnes of palm oil processed by the refineries last year, crude palm oil accounted for 15.9 million tonnes, while crude palm kernel oil made up 1.6 million tonnes, he said.

Despite the challenges faced by the refining industry, Uggah assured that his ministry would implement measures to ensure the sector remained competitive and viable.

"We will continue to work with Poram to address these issues, including facilitating better market access through ongoing Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations and the Malaysia-European Union Free Trade Agreement," he said.

Friday, October 31, 2014

MYpalmoil

MYpalmoil


Palm oil experts see continued price recovery

Posted: 29 Oct 2014 06:42 PM PDT

KUALA LUMPUR: OIL palm planters were a little happier at the recently-concluded Palm Oil Trade Seminar (POTS) 2014 when experts gave hopeful outlook on palm oil prices.

Hamburg-based ISTA Mielke GmbH executive director Thomas Mielke started off his forecast of palm oil pricing by assuring planters not to be carried away by bearish sentiment. "Price recovery is fundamentally justified."

He explained that palm oil, which is mainly used for food, is increasingly influenced by petroleum prices as countries all over the world look to excess edible oils as substitutes to depleting fossil fuels.

"If crude oil prices were to fall to US$75 (or RM245.20) a barrel or lower, palm prices could drop, too. This would trigger the swing factor ... the demand in the energy sector that is not mandated," said Mielke. 

With sustained demand for cooking oil and margarine from the global food industry, Mielke thinks palm oil prices are unlikely to drop below RM2,000 a tonne in the next couple of months.


He expects palm oil futures to climb further and trade between RM2,300 and RM2,500 a tonne by the first quarter of 2015. 

Yesterday, the third month benchmark palm oil futures on Bursa Malaysia Derivatives gained RM50 to close at RM2,263 a tonne.

This year, world production of palm oil is likely to rise to a record high of 59 million tonnes from last year's 56 million tonnes. 

Mielke, a well-respected and authoritative vegetable oil analyst, once again, rejected calls by green activists for a moratorium on oil palm plantings.

"The environmental activists like to pretend or dream of a world without palm oil. It would be terrible for consumers, especially those in developing countries where two thirds of the world population resides. The truth is, we cannot replace palm oil, at least not in large volumes," he said.

Jupiter Securities chartist Benny Lee said price recovery has already begun. "Palm oil prices are likely to be on the uptrend, supported by the strengthening of the US dollar and implementation of the B7 biodiesel mandate in the country."

Godrej International Ltd director Dorab Mistry was also optimistic when he said the worst is over. "Planters can look forward to better times. I think palm oil is likely to trade in a range of RM2,100 to RM2,300 a tonne in the next several weeks.

"In December, I expect futures to rise steadily as production declines begin to bite and stocks decline. However, given the current macro economic outlook, I do not expect a runaway bull market. I think prices are likely to appreciate to RM2,500 a tonne by March next year," he said. 

Thursday, October 30, 2014

MYpalmoil

MYpalmoil


I'm smiling again

Posted: 29 Oct 2014 02:57 AM PDT

The clock is ticking and it is getting late in the evening. I'm grumbling to myself that I'm having to work night shift today. 

That means I would be crawling through the jam-packed streets to get back to office by dinner time. Uuugghh!

I was suddenly "woken" from the monotony of listening to speakers after speakers delivering their speeches when a newly met friend gave me a packet a chocolate. Yay!

This is the first time in my career as a journalist covering a palm oil conference when I'm suddenly surprised with a packet of crunchy chocolate wafers.

This newly met friend was rushing to get back to Singapore and he graciously gave me this lovely gift made from palm specialty fats.

It brought a smile to my face. Today's conference coverage is not so boring after all.

FGV sells more biodiesel to China

Posted: 28 Oct 2014 07:17 PM PDT

KUALA LUMPUR (Bernama): Felda Global Ventures Holdings Bhd (FGV) is expanding its biodiesel business in China with the second shipment of 6,000 tonnes of palm oil methyl ester (PME) to Dongguan Port, Guangdong.


The company successfully made a maiden shipment of 6,000 tonnes of PME to Nansha Port, Guangzhou, last month.

Group president and chief executive officer Mohd Emir Mavani Abdullah said the first shipment was a highly significant development for FGV's biodiesel ambitions.

"By successfully penetrating the China market, FGV is on track to achieving its biodiesel global growth targets.

"China is one of the biggest biodiesel markets in the world. Given its huge energy requirements and reliance on biodiesel imports, we can meet this demand by virtue of being Malaysia's largest PME exporter," he said in a statement yesterday.

FGV currently accounts for 31.59 per cent of Malaysia's PME exports, he said, adding biodiesel trade between China and Malaysia is poised to rise, based on the former's rapidly growing interest in renewable energy.

From January to August, China had imported 590,777 tonnes of biodiesel from around the world.

The usage of PME is gaining popularity because the growing of the feedstock is sustainable from its economic, environment and social aspects. Fossil energy balance, which is the ratio between renewable energy output and fossil energy input is a good factor to compare biofuel sources. 

Topping the list is PME with a fossil energy balance of 9. This means that a litre of palm oil biofuel contains nine times the amount of energy as that required for its production. Sugar cane has values ranging from 2 to 8. Other feedstocks such as rapeseed, soya and corn have values which fall between 1 and 4.

When it comes to yield productivity, sugar cane and palm oil rank the highest. Sugar cane yields 6,000 litres of biofuel per hectare (l/ha), followed by oil palm and sugar beet (5,000-6,000 l/ha) but palm oil is superior as it has 27 per cent higher energy content (30.53 MJ/l) than ethanol from sugarcane (24MJ/l). 

Moderately efficient feedstock's such as corn, cassava and sweet sorghum yield 1,500-4,000 litres of biofuel per hectare( l/ha). Rapeseed, wheat and soya are the least efficient, yielding less than 1,500 l/ha.

Joint efforts to tackle palm oil trade barriers

Posted: 28 Oct 2014 06:49 PM PDT

KUALA LUMPUR: MALAYSIA, in welcoming the inauguration of the Jokowi administration, looks to Indonesia for continued efforts in poverty alleviation by jointly tackling smear campaigns and barriers to palm oil trade. 

Indonesia President Joko "Jokowi" Widodo unveiled his Cabinet line-up recently to govern Southeast Asia's biggest economy and the world's big supplier of coal, rubber, palm oil and mineral ores. 

"As main producers of palm oil, contributing to the world's food security, Malaysia is on the same page as Indonesia in developing agriculture in a way that balances the needs of people, planet and profits," said Malaysian Palm Oil Council chief executive officer Tan Sri Yusof Basiron on the sidelines of the Palm Oil Trade and Seminar, here, yesterday. 

"We were informed that our ministry will be seeking to continue bilateral talks to address the opening of markets that are increasingly hindered by non-tariff trade barriers and protectionism," he added.

A business-matchmaking session between palm oil buyers and suppliers, chalking up more than 100 appointments, was arranged in conjunction to this gathering of some 400 trade delegates.

"Oil palm planting and palm oil exports provide developing nations a path out of poverty. The growing of oil palms, the world's most efficient oil crop, is helping the people of Malaysia and Indonesia to improve their standard of living," said Yusof.

On striking a balance between the needs of people, planet and profits, Yusof said many tend to overlook that oil palms, just like other trees in the forest, contribute to carbon sinking. In times of surplus, excess palm oil also serves as an alternative to depleting fossil fuel.

Oil palm planting allows Indonesia and Malaysia to supply affordable and nutritious cooking oil and margarine to billions of people in developing nations such as China, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Vietnam. 

According to Oil World trade journal, Malaysia and Indonesia collectively export the bulk of 56 million tonnes of palm oil.

In the last five years, Malaysia earned between US$15 billion and US$20 billion (RM50 billion and RM70 billion) a year from palm oil exports. Indonesia Palm Oil Commission reportedly said the republic earns US$10 billion annually from palm oil shipments.

Malaysia's annual palm oil exports worth US$20 billion support two million jobs along the sprawling palm oil value chain.

Despite its positive attributes, Yusof said the oil palm industry continued to face discrimination. "Environmental activists continue to dictate certification criteria and lobby for the European Union Renewable Energy Directive which discriminates against palm oil. This discrimination is against rules laid down by the World Trade Organisation."

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

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Monday, October 27, 2014

MYpalmoil

MYpalmoil


I'm smiling

Posted: 26 Oct 2014 02:30 AM PDT

I usually go to this place, that has a green mermaid logo, for coffee.

:) Just so you know ... there's healthy palm specialty fats in latte.  

People in the service industry, especially retail, are trained to be skillful in the art of making customers feel special. 

After I placed my order, the barista whipped out his marker pen and asked for my name. I smiled and replied, "today, I'm Snow White."

His eyes widened and he chuckled. "So, where are all your seven dwarfs?" he asked.

That got me laughing. Today's a special day for me. Love this!

Smile! You're on camera

Posted: 25 Oct 2014 08:13 PM PDT

I've put up a posting before on synchronised swimming and palm oil. This time, it is featuring Team Malaysia synchronised swimmers. Aged 15 to 25, these group of girls diligently undergo gruelling training of six hours a day, six days in a week at the Bukit Jalil Aquatic Centre, Selangor.



Synchronised swimming -- an aquatic sport that fuses flexibility, balance, endurance, strength and … palm oil? Yes, one of the critical elements of synchronised swimming that captures the judges' attention is the make-up.

Unknown to many, water-proof cosmetics such as lipstick, moisturiser, hair gel and sun bloc are oleochemical derivatives, which in turn are processed from palm oil.



To last for a whole performance — equal to at least four laps up and down the Olympic size pool — synchonised swimmers' water-proof make-up have to be "strong" enough to withstand a tough beating underwater. To get the right look ...

1. Apply a layer of primer on their eyes to help the eye shadow stay on.
2. Then apply layer after layer of shadow, caking it on so that it is bright and doesn't get washed after one dunk in the pool.
3. Then come the layers of eyeliner and mascara — the more the better — to make their features stand out.

Synchronised swimmers also slick back their hair using super-sticky gel, made from oleochemicals. This gooey stuff helps keep their silky mane at bay throughout the competition. It only melts away after 30 minutes of hot shower.



Beneath these bright layers of make-up and pretty smiles are hours of insane athleticism exerted day-in-day-out to make synchronised swimming look delightfully easy on the eyes.